Cempasuchil: Marigolds and the Day of the Dead — By Lydian Shipp
Mexico North America Tips

Cempasuchil: Marigolds and the Day of the Dead — By Lydian Shipp

Cempasuchil, Marigolds for Day of the Dead
Marigolds are thought to provide special spiritual energies to help the dead make it back to the land of the living for only one night.

According to a variety of different pagan and occult belief systems, flowers contain etheric energies that beings on other planes can use for energy. Aztecs used marigolds for this purpose in their July and August ceremonies that celebrated dead loved ones. Westerners send flowers (usually without thinking about why) when someone passes and the flowers are typically stacked around the loved one during funeral ceremonies. Some systems of belief acknowledge that the etheric energies can help the deceased find their way to the light or gather the strength they need to proceed on a long journey to the next plane of reality. But in the United States and Europe, these beliefs aren’t explicitly stated. In fact, few people even know that the tradition of sending flowers after someone has died or when someone is very ill in the hospital comes from the belief that flowers emit an etheric energy that can aid in healing and strengthening the spirit.

Cempasuchil, or marigolds are a big part of the Dia de los Muertos ceremonies in Mexico.  Known as the Flower of the Dead, it’s no secret that the flowers are supposed to provide strength to dead relatives who are visiting loved ones from a far away place. In Nepal and India, marigolds are placed over dead bodies before cremation. Mexicans will construct arches out of the marigolds to provide a portal through which loved ones can commune with the living on October 31st, November 1, and November 2 each year.

Marigolds are grown throughout the world today, thriving in warm climates. They have a strong fragrance and certain

Marigolds, Flowers of the Dead
Huge tents and truckloads of marigolds for Day of the Dead are set up around town. Everyone is selling the huge orange flowers. On our way home, we walked under a tent filled with the Flowers of the Dead.

medicinal properties. They can be used to treat toothaches as well as certain digestive issues (such as parasitic infection) when the petals of the flower are brewed as a tea. Even though the marigold is also known as the flower of the dead (flor de muertos), it is still useful to the living.

Related Posts:

Dia de los Muertos (Day of the Dead) in Guanajuato, Mexico: Part I — By Jennifer Shipp

Dia de Muertos (Day of the Dead) in Guanajuato, Mexico: Part II — By Jennifer Shipp

Dia de Muertos (Day of the Dead) in Guanajuato, Mexico: Part III — By Jennifer Shipp

Dia de los Muertos (Day of the Dead) in Guanajuato, Mexico: Part IV — By Jennifer Shipp

Santa Muerte: Saint Death — By Lydian Shipp

Calaveras de Azucar: Sugar Skulls and the Day of the Dead — By Lydian Shipp  

Dia de los Muertos (Day of the Dead)- Part I — By Jennifer Shipp

Haunted Guanajuato: The House of the Witches and the Public Cemetery — By Jennifer Shipp

Haunted Guanajuato: Casa De Las Brujas in Guanajuato, Mexico — By Lydian Shipp

You Recently Viewed ...

The So-Called Curse of Being a “High-Maintenance” Woman — By Lydian Shipp

Travel as a Self-Imposed “Time Out” — By Lydian Shipp

Baggage and Bullshit: Thanksgiving in Mexico — By Jennifer Shipp

As Many Impossible Things As Possible — By Jennifer Shipp

Deep Drifts and Warmly Lit Windows — By Jennifer Shipp

LEAVE A COMMENT

Bruised Banana